Jefferson OT students to present at Virtual Ability’s Mental Health Symposium on 5-2-15

Mental Health Symposium – May 2, 2015 – Losing It: On Disability, Diagnosis, and Depression

sojourner_auditorium_virtual_ability_001_edited-1

See schedule of entire event at:

http://blog.virtualability.org/2015/04/mental-health-symposium-may-2-2015.html

Looks like a great conference!
OT Students Jenna Hannan and Amanda Gilroy will present on “Everyday Language
and Clinical Diagnosis in Depression and Anxiety.”

Mental Heath Events Attract Diverse/international audience

MH events

Mental Health Events at OT Center at Jefferson in Second Life


On February 17 and 19, 1st year OT students Kaitlin (Rukii Winterwolf) and Veronica (Vironica Loxley) presented about the role of OT in mental health. Their presentation, Beyond Stigma to Participation, started with a video excerpt and discussion question on stigma and mental health and went on to provide a detailed summary of OT’s role in mental health. 2nd year students Andrea and Stephanie also assisted with the events.
Audiences were quite different at the two presentations. On Thursday evening, most who attended were educators or health care practitioners. On Saturday, most participants who came to the presentation had a more personal interest in the topic, with family or themselves experiencing the effects of stigma. Participants included those from Scotland, England, Spain, Dubai, Croatia, and the United States. It was gratifying to see the interest that a simple announcement and event notice generated:

Come and enjoy an interactive presentation on Mental Health Conditions and the role of an Occupational Therapist. Presented by occupational therapy students at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia

National Alzheimer’s Project Act

January meeting
The January meeting of our support group for caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s focused on passage of the National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA). Our new first year student, Vironica Loxley, did considerable research for the talk which was presented by Zsuzsa Tomsen and Geri Kuhn, group facilitators. Our main sources of information for the talk were the Alzheimer’s association (NAPA information), the report of the Alzheimer’s Study Group, and a discussion of non-pharmacologic treatments written by Drs. Laura Gitlin and Mary Mittelman. Geri also shared interesting commentary by Sandra Day O’Connor and Maria Shriver. The session was well-attended and included lively discussion of the issues that arise for implementing NAPA. Among the issues raised were: use of Second Life vs. a non-commercial virtual world such as Open Sim to present such topics and mobilize for action, the role of Medicare in funding interventions for those with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers, and the use of social networks to implement programming for NAPA. We hope this talk will be a starting point for more discussions and action that may help persons with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers.

Health Care Panel on Metaverse TV

Health care panel on Metaverse TV, July 2010

Metaverse TV’s panel on health care in Second Life was a lively discussion that included the challenges of ensuring service quality, turf issues in academia, and support of telemedicine on par with face to face treatment. The segment can be found here, the panel starts at about (time marker) 20.09. I participated along with Tymeless Sands, a psychotherapist; Saxet Uralia, a health care educator; and Kaznats Oh, an ICU nurse who wrote an illustrated book on heart disease.

Metaverse Health Care Panel July 2010


Our host Scorpinosis Nightfire kept the discussion going with probing questions and comments revealing his take on the topic. His remark that “Second Life is so much more than a game” sums up the session and reminds me of another quote I frequently use from Bill Freese, “serious work in a cartoon world.” Along those lines, Tymeless Sands discussed how she uses Second Life to extend her real life work in behavioral health. Tymeless also let us know about a current bill in the House of Representatives (#5025) that extends behavioral health implementation via telemedicine, such as facilitating distance clinical consultations in rural and underserved areas. It’s interesting to note that there are now 12 states that now mandate telemedicine coverage
The panel seemed to end all too soon, and Sporpinosis made us all promise to return for Part 2. Saxet suggested that we might even be able to do this for SLCC–stay tuned.